where are all the runners?
04/22/2015 1:10:21 PM
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midway through the season, I have decided that it's not just me. (I only have 6 athletes on my HS track team, a ridiculous number for a mid-size Class 2 school). At every meet we have attended, there have been a number of events where there were fewer participants than scoring places. I know that if I had 4 girls, they would be circling the track for the 4th place spot in the 4x800 instead of sitting in the stands, and I know most coaches share that viewpoint. So where are all the kids? For a lot of us, spring softball has taken a lot of girls away from track. There are other new activities too, including my favorite: the bass fishing team. After being out of the coaching game for 5 years, I am just puzzled at the lack of numbers and passion for the sport. I am not really sure what the solution is either. Our elementary PE teachers include a lot of running in their classes, and that carries over into the middle school. But getting kids to transition from being a stud in 4th Hour PE to actually joining the track team has proven difficult. Technically, our athletes are allowed to participate in two sports simultaneously. But even though those baseball/softball/volleyball practices count toward the minimum required sessions, they don't really prepare kids for the track events beyond some field events and the shortest sprints. One of my parents asked me how things were going last week, and I told him, "Good and bad. The good news is - I can still beat all of them in a 5 mile run. The bad news is the same thing." That just shouldn't happen at my age. Wish I had some eligibility left...
midway through the season, I have decided that it's not just me. (I only have 6 athletes on my HS track team, a ridiculous number for a mid-size Class 2 school).

At every meet we have attended, there have been a number of events where there were fewer participants than scoring places. I know that if I had 4 girls, they would be circling the track for the 4th place spot in the 4x800 instead of sitting in the stands, and I know most coaches share that viewpoint.

So where are all the kids? For a lot of us, spring softball has taken a lot of girls away from track. There are other new activities too, including my favorite: the bass fishing team.

After being out of the coaching game for 5 years, I am just puzzled at the lack of numbers and passion for the sport. I am not really sure what the solution is either. Our elementary PE teachers include a lot of running in their classes, and that carries over into the middle school. But getting kids to transition from being a stud in 4th Hour PE to actually joining the track team has proven difficult.

Technically, our athletes are allowed to participate in two sports simultaneously. But even though those baseball/softball/volleyball practices count toward the minimum required sessions, they don't really prepare kids for the track events beyond some field events and the shortest sprints.

One of my parents asked me how things were going last week, and I told him, "Good and bad. The good news is - I can still beat all of them in a 5 mile run. The bad news is the same thing."

That just shouldn't happen at my age.

Wish I had some eligibility left...
04/23/2015 3:24:27 PM
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Joined: Nov 2013
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I’m with you on the lack of students going out for sports. In the smaller schools, class 1, 2, it’s very difficult to even field teams in sports like track that take a large number of athletes. There are lots of reasons why but I think the addition of other sports has contributed to it. First girls’ softball and now soccer has the same season as track. Both of these sports are very popular and have taken away many of the athletes that otherwise would run track. With too few participants to even fill up all the events we have no chance at any team scores.
I'm with you on the lack of students going out for sports. In the smaller schools, class 1, 2, it's very difficult to even field teams in sports like track that take a large number of athletes. There are lots of reasons why but I think the addition of other sports has contributed to it. First girls' softball and now soccer has the same season as track. Both of these sports are very popular and have taken away many of the athletes that otherwise would run track. With too few participants to even fill up all the events we have no chance at any team scores.
04/24/2015 10:33:34 AM
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Joined: Sep 2007
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We have been fortunate enough to still have decent numbers on our teams (25ish girls and 50ish boys), but practice attendance is not what it used to be. I remember in high school wanting to try chess club (yes I am a nerd), but I didn't have the courage to ask my cross-country, swimming, and track coaches if I could miss practice ONCE A MONTH. We have kids who only show up 3 times a week, or even less. Some of them are even among our best athletes. Sean Nunn Raytown South
We have been fortunate enough to still have decent numbers on our teams (25ish girls and 50ish boys), but practice attendance is not what it used to be. I remember in high school wanting to try chess club (yes I am a nerd), but I didn't have the courage to ask my cross-country, swimming, and track coaches if I could miss practice ONCE A MONTH. We have kids who only show up 3 times a week, or even less. Some of them are even among our best athletes.

Sean Nunn
Raytown South
04/24/2015 10:59:06 AM
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Joined: Sep 2011
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Wow. If we missed any practices for any reason other than injury or illness we didn't get to race in the next meet. Granted -- that was a long time ago. I think the addition of sports like baseball, softball and soccer really hurts the numbers for track and cross country for all but the largest schools. Baseball, softball and soccer are sports that many kids start at age 5 or even younger and play every year growing up. It's easy to see how they may not want to switch over to running in high school. Just look at middle school track (where it's the only spring sport) and see how the participation numbers are huge.
Wow. If we missed any practices for any reason other than injury or illness we didn't get to race in the next meet. Granted -- that was a long time ago.
I think the addition of sports like baseball, softball and soccer really hurts the numbers for track and cross country for all but the largest schools. Baseball, softball and soccer are sports that many kids start at age 5 or even younger and play every year growing up. It's easy to see how they may not want to switch over to running in high school. Just look at middle school track (where it's the only spring sport) and see how the participation numbers are huge.
04/24/2015 11:15:59 AM
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Yes, having to swallow the reality that kids think nothing of regularly missing practice was a real wakeup call for my return to coaching. and yes I see lots of huge middle school teams, but not many great middle school performances. middle school kids think practice consists of a quick warmup, then an hour of chatting and playing in the field event venues. Intervals? Distance ladders? Heaven forbid.
Yes, having to swallow the reality that kids think nothing of regularly missing practice was a real wakeup call for my return to coaching.

and yes I see lots of huge middle school teams, but not many great middle school performances. middle school kids think practice consists of a quick warmup, then an hour of chatting and playing in the field event venues. Intervals? Distance ladders? Heaven forbid.
04/24/2015 12:33:32 PM
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This is a great topic for discussion and it leads me to a couple other questions that should be considered and maybe you all have answers to... We know we have lost them to other sports, so what is it about the other sport that they like better than track/xc? What are some of the advantages our sport has over the others? What can we do to get some of these kids back into our sport? Realistically, we will never get all these kids back from other sports but if we can get most of the "right" ones back I believe our sport can still thrive.
This is a great topic for discussion and it leads me to a couple other questions that should be considered and maybe you all have answers to...

We know we have lost them to other sports, so what is it about the other sport that they like better than track/xc?

What are some of the advantages our sport has over the others?

What can we do to get some of these kids back into our sport?

Realistically, we will never get all these kids back from other sports but if we can get most of the "right" ones back I believe our sport can still thrive.
04/24/2015 5:05:38 PM
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Joined: Apr 2012
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1) Lacrosse. Our school has girls lacrosse in the spring. They have over 90 girls on the team. We just started boys lacrosse this spring (freshman and sophomores only) and I counted 10 boys we lost this year. 2) Strength and Conditioning. Our school has a very active strength and conditioning program, primarily geared to football. We lose many kids to that program. I try to explain to the kids (and other coaches) that track and field is strength and conditioning.....
1) Lacrosse.

Our school has girls lacrosse in the spring. They have over 90 girls on the team.

We just started boys lacrosse this spring (freshman and sophomores only) and I counted 10 boys we lost this year.

2) Strength and Conditioning.

Our school has a very active strength and conditioning program, primarily geared to football. We lose many kids to that program. I try to explain to the kids (and other coaches) that track and field is strength and conditioning.....
04/25/2015 9:40:10 AM
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1. At our school the other sport is less work. We work our girls very hard and the other spring program is easier...don't know if it inappropriately easy but practices are shorter and don't involve repeat 450s or repeat 1000s. 2.hang in there, be competitive. Our biggest draw is the kids in the program, they have to get out and promote the sport to the other kids. I send letters and make it a point to talk to our middle school runners, but a senior going up and talking to the 8th graders about there race..that is where it is at. Sometimes you have to ask them to take interest and sometimes they just care. My girls this year were talking race strategy, encouragement, and congratulating the kids at JH invite without a word from me, proud poppa moment. 3. Success breeds success! Find something you can do at a high level with your athletes and build from there. We started with 8 girls my first year as the head girls coach at a school of nearly a thousand. We now get a solid 30 girls. I think sport participation is down in mshsaa sports for another reason and it speaks to the point about missed practices. Year round "select" sports and specializing kids at age 10 is a huge problem, and for a lot of reasons. Have to let kids be kids and play multiple sports it is good for them. I know that distance runners buck this idea and it may be biased but especially 15-17 year olds that want to be great distance kids really do need to keep running almost year round. Everyone else needs to cross train and track and field is great for other sports but that will not ever excite a kid for our sport. Years we have been most successful is when we have multi sport athletes, some who become true track kids.
1. At our school the other sport is less work. We work our girls very hard and the other spring program is easier...don't know if it inappropriately easy but practices are shorter and don't involve repeat 450s or repeat 1000s.

2.hang in there, be competitive. Our biggest draw is the kids in the program, they have to get out and promote the sport to the other kids. I send letters and make it a point to talk to our middle school runners, but a senior going up and talking to the 8th graders about there race..that is where it is at. Sometimes you have to ask them to take interest and sometimes they just care. My girls this year were talking race strategy, encouragement, and congratulating the kids at JH invite without a word from me, proud poppa moment.

3. Success breeds success! Find something you can do at a high level with your athletes and build from there. We started with 8 girls my first year as the head girls coach at a school of nearly a thousand. We now get a solid 30 girls.

I think sport participation is down in mshsaa sports for another reason and it speaks to the point about missed practices. Year round "select" sports and specializing kids at age 10 is a huge problem, and for a lot of reasons. Have to let kids be kids and play multiple sports it is good for them. I know that distance runners buck this idea and it may be biased but especially 15-17 year olds that want to be great distance kids really do need to keep running almost year round. Everyone else needs to cross train and track and field is great for other sports but that will not ever excite a kid for our sport. Years we have been most successful is when we have multi sport athletes, some who become true track kids.
04/26/2015 10:43:13 PM
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I completely agree with everything stated above. One major problem I've encountered with trying to get kids out for track/xc is that it is a lot more work than other sports, and the kids know it. In xc, one thing I have tried to help get kids into running is to allow 9th/10th graders to play any other sport and xc at the same time, as long as we workout a practice/meet schedule ahead of time. The reason why I tried this was based off of 2 points. 1.)I felt like a major hypocrite by discouraging the early specialization of kids in sports like soccer, for example, only to tell these same kids they should run all year long if they want to continue improving. 2.)I am trying to sell them on a sport which isn't their first choice and probably sounds horrible when described to them. Because of this I felt like I needed to do everything I could to get them to at least try it, which mean working with them and their other sports. Once they try it for a season and they still don't like it then it just wasn't meant to be.
I completely agree with everything stated above. One major problem I've encountered with trying to get kids out for track/xc is that it is a lot more work than other sports, and the kids know it. In xc, one thing I have tried to help get kids into running is to allow 9th/10th graders to play any other sport and xc at the same time, as long as we workout a practice/meet schedule ahead of time. The reason why I tried this was based off of 2 points. 1.)I felt like a major hypocrite by discouraging the early specialization of kids in sports like soccer, for example, only to tell these same kids they should run all year long if they want to continue improving. 2.)I am trying to sell them on a sport which isn't their first choice and probably sounds horrible when described to them. Because of this I felt like I needed to do everything I could to get them to at least try it, which mean working with them and their other sports. Once they try it for a season and they still don't like it then it just wasn't meant to be.
04/27/2015 9:26:34 AM
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I think the point about sports specialization is an important one for both parents and coaches. It's a difficult call - does a young athlete really even know their potential at 10, 12 or even 15 years old? Kids are still developing physically, mentally and emotionally well into their late teens. I think we do them a dis-service by telling a youngster that they have to 'choose one sport' too early. There is a huge risk of burnout and injury; but perhaps an even larger risk is that they miss out on trying something they may love even more. Just my two cents and perhaps a bit off-topic.
I think the point about sports specialization is an important one for both parents and coaches. It's a difficult call - does a young athlete really even know their potential at 10, 12 or even 15 years old? Kids are still developing physically, mentally and emotionally well into their late teens. I think we do them a dis-service by telling a youngster that they have to 'choose one sport' too early. There is a huge risk of burnout and injury; but perhaps an even larger risk is that they miss out on trying something they may love even more.

Just my two cents and perhaps a bit off-topic.
04/27/2015 11:23:19 AM
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These are all very valid and insightful points. I hate to tell the kids who play volleyball and fall baseball that they have to choose cross country because most of them will disappear. but I also know that if they are required to attend every minute of volleyball or baseball practice and never get a chance to run with the team, they will never come close to reaching their running potential and most won't even be competitive. same thing for track vs baseball/softball etc. our middle school track girls are even pressured to attend off-season high school volleyball conditioning in the heart of their competitive schedule. does anyone hold track/xc practice in the mornings? I am wondering if I should try that next year to avoid some of the conflicts. I am too old school to switch to being a babysitting service. I want to see work and passion.
These are all very valid and insightful points.

I hate to tell the kids who play volleyball and fall baseball that they have to choose cross country because most of them will disappear.

but I also know that if they are required to attend every minute of volleyball or baseball practice and never get a chance to run with the team, they will never come close to reaching their running potential and most won't even be competitive.

same thing for track vs baseball/softball etc.

our middle school track girls are even pressured to attend off-season high school volleyball conditioning in the heart of their competitive schedule.

does anyone hold track/xc practice in the mornings? I am wondering if I should try that next year to avoid some of the conflicts.

I am too old school to switch to being a babysitting service. I want to see work and passion.
04/28/2015 3:18:24 PM
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I find myself agreeing with just about all of you. 1. There is no question as to why more kids go out for other sports than cross-country and track: a lot of them are easier than our sports. We should embrace that. At our school, we don't have a huge number of kids in our school out for track, but we have the overwhelming majority of true athletes that are in a spring sport. That probably isn't true everywhere. 2. Part of the challenge is convincing kids that they are better off running track/cross-country than sitting on the sidelines in another sport. Of course if they are genuinely good in another sport, then maybe their decision is a rational one. It never bothers me not to have the starting QB on my cross-country team. It is not having the third string kicker that bothers me. 3. Senior leadership is HUGE. Our girls' team numbers are low because our senior girls leadership this year is extremely poor. Boys are better, which is one reason why we have more boys running. Other years we have had great leadership and it showed. 2008 comes to mind. 4. Not sure what to do about practice attendance. Again I will probably step on some toes here, but we live in a society that doesn't value our commitments. Look at our divorce rates, the number of people who quit a job without another one lined up, the number of "fathers" who don't support their kids, etc, etc, etc. How we change that is up to us as leaders. It is an uphill battle for sure. Sean Nunn Raytown South
I find myself agreeing with just about all of you.

1. There is no question as to why more kids go out for other sports than cross-country and track: a lot of them are easier than our sports. We should embrace that. At our school, we don't have a huge number of kids in our school out for track, but we have the overwhelming majority of true athletes that are in a spring sport. That probably isn't true everywhere.

2. Part of the challenge is convincing kids that they are better off running track/cross-country than sitting on the sidelines in another sport. Of course if they are genuinely good in another sport, then maybe their decision is a rational one. It never bothers me not to have the starting QB on my cross-country team. It is not having the third string kicker that bothers me.

3. Senior leadership is HUGE. Our girls' team numbers are low because our senior girls leadership this year is extremely poor. Boys are better, which is one reason why we have more boys running. Other years we have had great leadership and it showed. 2008 comes to mind.

4. Not sure what to do about practice attendance. Again I will probably step on some toes here, but we live in a society that doesn't value our commitments. Look at our divorce rates, the number of people who quit a job without another one lined up, the number of "fathers" who don't support their kids, etc, etc, etc. How we change that is up to us as leaders. It is an uphill battle for sure.

Sean Nunn
Raytown South
04/28/2015 9:30:31 PM
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Joined: Apr 2009
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This might be a bit off topic... but I have been coping with the same concerns for several years...this is where I am at now, this season. I think we operate under a few misconceptions. The other sports – the club sports especially – have nurtured a relationship with a cohort of kids. They own the kids. The parents have invested large sums in the sport. We cannot break up these happy families. The time commitment for track and XC is actually less than the weekly requirements for the other sports (or activities: Band, Clubs, Cheer, Dance, etc). ‘Skills’ night goes on year round in football, basketball and wrestling. They play 80 games of baseball a year; they play softball for 8 hours per day on the weekend. Football requires morning practices year round, and afternoon lifting. In our situation the football players dominate the weight room with extremely loud music 2 or 3 days a week. There is a lot of (misplaced) testosterone. I have seen the pressure – and heard the coaches holler at track/football athletes in the hall – that the football players are under to practice with “their brothers”. In my experience the only thing that happens is the football players become good at quitting track. In football you pay big bucks for camps, have mandatory fundraising, booster club fees, etc. You get what you pay for – track doesn’t require the same monetary investment. I think the message is clear to the kids: football and baseball and basketball are where the money ‘is’. And every club team can win a “national” championship at Disneyworld. So the 365 sports merry go round continues. The talent we are 'missing' is overrated. I have people on the team who are the ‘fastest’ in their club sport. I must say they are not that fast. I categorize talent by levels: Quad meet, Invitational B (4-10 at a local invitational), Local (1-4 at an invitational), Sub-regional (top 10 in an event within 100 mile circle), Regional (top ten in the state) and National. I think I can take a freshman and move them up, sometimes to sub-regional, certainly to the ocal level, if they start out at least Invitational B. The other sports cannot do that, in my opinion. In track everyone runs 4:30 in high school – when you look at college. And then they develop, or not. But in the other sports colleges want only the top talent to match their league, with a few exceptions. And there are exceptions in all sports of course. But we get too excited about kids way too early. When I look closely at soccer or football I don’t see much that would help us win major meets. A thrower, perhaps, sometimes a sprinter (though not as often as you think). We had 105 girls come out and 60 boys. We have a limited number of Local talent. To compete as for a team score they have to run 4 events. And that is discouraging to the other lesser talents. I find scheduling team "picture day" late in the season encourages a longer period of participation for the otherwise uninspired. :) And I always have one or two who surprise, and one or two who will ask their parents “Is it all right that (after a week or so) I already like track (or XC) more than I like (swimming, soccer, tiddlewinks, badminton)?” In the end it is still just high school. Everyone will be faster when they are 50 and recalling the day. And the one or two per year that go on to a small college will still be running in a couple of years. But winning? You have to plan on that and I have not figured out a sure fire way to get the 6-10 athletes that you need for a state title. Family tradition is a big help. Large teams are unnecessary but the Jimmies and the Joes are not. You need sub-regional and above, though a national talent on a relay can upgrade a squad of local talent. I went the national junior USATFF meet one year; 10-12 thousand athletes. There were volunteer coaches, club coaches, pastors, etc. The sport is alive and well, just not in all areas of the USA. And suburbia has a lot of money to throw at the other “elite” sports. I think the “elite” is a code; you figure it out. I find it depressing to calculate the amount of time I spend on Quad and below talent. And they never get any better. I have seen every one of them over and over – just the names change. Coaching is very hard and extremely frustrating. And very complicated. And just because you win you are not an expert. So we are evolving our philosophy, as I am sure everyone else does, to emphasize the “other” stuff. We are an academic institution and some of the things we can teach are valuable: hard work, discipline, integrity, etc. Some days it seems we make progress, other days it seems not. I have no idea how to cure the attendance problem. The better the athlete, the less the problem – does that make it not a problem? By the time they get to high “local” we don’t have much problem at all. For the rest we average about 87-90% per day. I cannot say how much I admire all the track and cross country coaches I have met. I cannot even begin to imagine how bad off the sport would be without the commitment I see from the coaches I know.
This might be a bit off topic... but I have been coping with the same concerns for several years...this is where I am at now, this season.

I think we operate under a few misconceptions. The other sports -- the club sports especially -- have nurtured a relationship with a cohort of kids. They own the kids. The parents have invested large sums in the sport. We cannot break up these happy families.
The time commitment for track and XC is actually less than the weekly requirements for the other sports (or activities: Band, Clubs, Cheer, Dance, etc). 'Skills' night goes on year round in football, basketball and wrestling. They play 80 games of baseball a year; they play softball for 8 hours per day on the weekend.
Football requires morning practices year round, and afternoon lifting. In our situation the football players dominate the weight room with extremely loud music 2 or 3 days a week. There is a lot of (misplaced) testosterone. I have seen the pressure -- and heard the coaches holler at track/football athletes in the hall -- that the football players are under to practice with "their brothers". In my experience the only thing that happens is the football players become good at quitting track. In football you pay big bucks for camps, have mandatory fundraising, booster club fees, etc. You get what you pay for -- track doesn't require the same monetary investment. I think the message is clear to the kids: football and baseball and basketball are where the money 'is'. And every club team can win a "national" championship at Disneyworld. So the 365 sports merry go round continues.
The talent we are 'missing' is overrated. I have people on the team who are the 'fastest' in their club sport. I must say they are not that fast. I categorize talent by levels: Quad meet, Invitational B (4-10 at a local invitational), Local (1-4 at an invitational), Sub-regional (top 10 in an event within 100 mile circle), Regional (top ten in the state) and National. I think I can take a freshman and move them up, sometimes to sub-regional, certainly to the ocal level, if they start out at least Invitational B. The other sports cannot do that, in my opinion.
In track everyone runs 4:30 in high school -- when you look at college. And then they develop, or not. But in the other sports colleges want only the top talent to match their league, with a few exceptions. And there are exceptions in all sports of course. But we get too excited about kids way too early. When I look closely at soccer or football I don't see much that would help us win major meets. A thrower, perhaps, sometimes a sprinter (though not as often as you think).
We had 105 girls come out and 60 boys. We have a limited number of Local talent. To compete as for a team score they have to run 4 events. And that is discouraging to the other lesser talents.
I find scheduling team "picture day" late in the season encourages a longer period of participation for the otherwise uninspired. :) And I always have one or two who surprise, and one or two who will ask their parents "Is it all right that (after a week or so) I already like track (or XC) more than I like (swimming, soccer, tiddlewinks, badminton)?"
In the end it is still just high school. Everyone will be faster when they are 50 and recalling the day. And the one or two per year that go on to a small college will still be running in a couple of years. But winning? You have to plan on that and I have not figured out a sure fire way to get the 6-10 athletes that you need for a state title. Family tradition is a big help.
Large teams are unnecessary but the Jimmies and the Joes are not. You need sub-regional and above, though a national talent on a relay can upgrade a squad of local talent.
I went the national junior USATFF meet one year; 10-12 thousand athletes. There were volunteer coaches, club coaches, pastors, etc. The sport is alive and well, just not in all areas of the USA. And suburbia has a lot of money to throw at the other "elite" sports. I think the "elite" is a code; you figure it out.
I find it depressing to calculate the amount of time I spend on Quad and below talent. And they never get any better. I have seen every one of them over and over -- just the names change. Coaching is very hard and extremely frustrating. And very complicated. And just because you win you are not an expert. So we are evolving our philosophy, as I am sure everyone else does, to emphasize the "other" stuff. We are an academic institution and some of the things we can teach are valuable: hard work, discipline, integrity, etc. Some days it seems we make progress, other days it seems not.
I have no idea how to cure the attendance problem. The better the athlete, the less the problem -- does that make it not a problem? By the time they get to high "local" we don't have much problem at all. For the rest we average about 87-90% per day.
I cannot say how much I admire all the track and cross country coaches I have met. I cannot even begin to imagine how bad off the sport would be without the commitment I see from the coaches I know.
04/28/2015 10:24:21 PM
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Well said, it does seem to be the kids you don't count on that miss practice or develop a limp every time it is lactate day. My feelings/problems on "select" sports that I reflected earlier is the pressure put them even at a young age. Today was just another day where I see an athlete(JH kid) and ask who is that and why isn't she out for track.....PE coach states....she's a big time softball kid that is all she does. Yet another 12 year old playing year round softball.
Well said, it does seem to be the kids you don't count on that miss practice or develop a limp every time it is lactate day.

My feelings/problems on "select" sports that I reflected earlier is the pressure put them even at a young age. Today was just another day where I see an athlete(JH kid) and ask who is that and why isn't she out for track.....PE coach states....she's a big time softball kid that is all she does. Yet another 12 year old playing year round softball.
04/28/2015 10:52:28 PM
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@tfrank LOL I had a kid tell me he was "kind of a big deal" on his soccer team. So this late in the season I don't know what he CAN do, but I have a good idea of when he cannot do anything.
@tfrank LOL I had a kid tell me he was "kind of a big deal" on his soccer team. So this late in the season I don't know what he CAN do, but I have a good idea of when he cannot do anything.
04/29/2015 12:54:56 PM
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One additional thought about the difference between cross-country/track/(swimming) and ball sports: if you are a JV kid in a ball sport you can imagine that you are really just as good as the varsity player at your position, if only "the coach would give you a chance." It is a lot harder to maintain that illusion in our sports: the watch doesn't lie. Sean Nunn Raytown South
One additional thought about the difference between cross-country/track/(swimming) and ball sports: if you are a JV kid in a ball sport you can imagine that you are really just as good as the varsity player at your position, if only "the coach would give you a chance." It is a lot harder to maintain that illusion in our sports: the watch doesn't lie.

Sean Nunn
Raytown South
04/30/2015 8:15:41 AM
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[quote=seannunn]One additional thought about the difference between cross-country/track/(swimming) and ball sports: if you are a JV kid in a ball sport you can imagine that you are really just as good as the varsity player at your position, if only "the coach would give you a chance." It is a lot harder to maintain that illusion in our sports: the watch doesn't lie. Sean Nunn Raytown South[/quote] @seannunn Yes, but the slowest kids in our sport get the most playing time!;-)
seannunn wrote:
One additional thought about the difference between cross-country/track/(swimming) and ball sports: if you are a JV kid in a ball sport you can imagine that you are really just as good as the varsity player at your position, if only "the coach would give you a chance." It is a lot harder to maintain that illusion in our sports: the watch doesn't lie.

Sean Nunn
Raytown South


@seannunn

Yes, but the slowest kids in our sport get the most playing time!
04/30/2015 8:52:38 AM
Coach
Joined: Sep 2007
Posts: 1107
[quote=Big_Al_2112]seannunnOne additional thought about the difference between cross-country/track/(swimming) and ball sports: if you are a JV kid in a ball sport you can imagine that you are really just as good as the varsity player at your position, if only "the coach would give you a chance." It is a lot harder to maintain that illusion in our sports: the watch doesn't lie. Sean Nunn Raytown South @seannunn Yes, but the slowest kids in our sport get the most playing time![/quote] @Big_Al_2112 Leave it to BigAl to find the silver lining. Sean Nunn
Big_Al_2112 wrote:
seannunnOne additional thought about the difference between cross-country/track/(swimming) and ball sports: if you are a JV kid in a ball sport you can imagine that you are really just as good as the varsity player at your position, if only "the coach would give you a chance." It is a lot harder to maintain that illusion in our sports: the watch doesn't lie.

Sean Nunn
Raytown South

@seannunn

Yes, but the slowest kids in our sport get the most playing time!


@Big_Al_2112

Leave it to BigAl to find the silver lining.

Sean Nunn
04/30/2015 9:33:40 AM
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Joined: Nov 2013
Posts: 35
@Big_Al_2112 I had to laugh when I read your comment, very true. CC is also one of the few sports that everyone gets to participate. Most other sports if you aren’t one of the better players you ride the bench most if not all of the time. This can help with recruiting but usually not until they have set the bench for a season before it gets through to them.
@Big_Al_2112
I had to laugh when I read your comment, very true. CC is also one of the few sports that everyone gets to participate. Most other sports if you aren't one of the better players you ride the bench most if not all of the time. This can help with recruiting but usually not until they have set the bench for a season before it gets through to them.
04/30/2015 1:03:05 PM
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Joined: Aug 2007
Posts: 778
just a small update... at the Ozark 7 conference meet yesterday, I wasn't the only one with participation issues. girls high jump - ONE entrant girls 3200 M run - ONE entrant girls 1600 M run - TWO entrants girls 4x200 meter relay - NO entries. girls 4x400 meter relay - ONE team girls 4x800 relay - NO entries.
just a small update...

at the Ozark 7 conference meet yesterday, I wasn't the only one with participation issues.

girls high jump - ONE entrant

girls 3200 M run - ONE entrant

girls 1600 M run - TWO entrants

girls 4x200 meter relay - NO entries.

girls 4x400 meter relay - ONE team

girls 4x800 relay - NO entries.

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